Rebranding

A rebranding exercise can be incredibly exciting, powerful and invigorating, especially for small companies.

The London Olympics 2012 emblem is unconventionally bold, deliberately spirited and unexpectedly dissonant, according to its designers.

The organisers say it’s an invitation to take part and be involved.

The public, on the other hand, think it’s ‘a puerile mess, an artistic flop and a commercial scandal’ or ‘a seizure-inducing health hazard’.

Maybe one day we’ll all learn to love the London 2012 logo.

But in the meantime, it’s a great reminder of the cynicism that often surrounds branding, even in today’s socially networked, media-savvy, design-conscious world.

Like everyone else we watched with bemusement as the Post Office became Consignia, and then transformed itself back again, before the ink was even dry on the new stationery.

But now we have been through our own rebranding exercise, and we learned a very valuable lesson: never underestimate the power of a rebrand.

It can be incredibly exciting, powerful and invigorating, especially for small companies.

We wanted our rebranding to reflect the company’s emphasis on ‘sustainable architecture’. Environmental issues are becoming increasingly important and there is an associated increase in public awareness.  There is generally less awareness of the contribution that good building design can make to reducing pollution and improving the environment.

That meant a new logo, new colours.

More than that, it meant a new way of thinking about ourselves and the work we do.

We wanted to reflect the new company in all our communications, and develop a brand that everyone could get behind.

We believe the result is a company that everyone can feel positive and confident about.